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Social Security

AB Leadership Wednesday, Sep 7 2011

TPM: Rick Perry: 45 Year-Olds Should Really Be Talking About Retiring At Age 70 (VIDEO)

"Rick Perry, under fire for his Social Security views from all sides lately, threw another log on the blaze this weekend during a South Carolina town hall. Perry floated the idea that workers 45 years-old and younger might have to wait years longer than their elders to retire with government benefits, wading into an area of Social Security reform that is extremely controversial and politically dangerous..."

News Wednesday, Sep 7 2011

RELEASE: American Bridge Slams Perry: “America’s Most Dangerous Cowboy Takes On Social Security”

Washington, DC – In a brand new video, American Bridge 21st Century blasts Republican presidential candidate Rick Perry over his dangerous views on Social Security and retirement security for America’s seniors. In thinking Social Security is an “abuse of the constitution,” a “lie” and a “ponzi scheme” that should be dismantled and forced on the states, Perry’s views are more extreme than we’ve seen in half a century. He doesn’t just think the program should be tweaked, but that it never should have existed in the first place. Miles outside the mainstream, Perry’s extreme views will continue to dog him throughout his campaign -- no matter whether it’s in the primary or the general. Just this morning, Karl Rove warned that Perry’s views on Social Security were “toxic in a general election environment and they are also toxic in a Republican primary.”

News Wednesday, Sep 7 2011

American Bridge Slams Perry: “America’s Most Dangerous Cowboy Takes On Social Security”

In a brand new video, American Bridge 21st Century blasts Republican presidential candidate Rick Perry over his dangerous views on Social Security and retirement security for America’s seniors. In thinking Social Security is an “abuse of the constitution,” a “lie” and a “ponzi scheme” that should be dismantled and forced on the states, Perry’s views are more extreme than we’ve seen in half a century. He doesn’t just think the program should be tweaked, but that it never should have existed in the first place. Miles outside the mainstream, Perry’s extreme views will continue to dog him throughout his campaign -- no matter whether it’s in the primary or the general. Just this morning, Karl Rove warned that Perry’s views on Social Security were “toxic in a general election environment and they are also toxic in a Republican primary.”

AB Leadership Health Care Friday, Sep 2 2011

POLITICO: Rick Perry's book a treasure trove for foes

"Ty Matsdorf, communications director for the Democratic research group American Bridge, said the book shows Perry “laying out what any sane or rational candidate wouldn’t even dream of saying.” “This is what he put down and there’s no backing away from it,” Matsdorf said. “I don’t think a national candidate would, in their worst nightmare, ever think about having this stuff out there.”"

News Saturday, Jan 1 2011

Mitt Romney On Social Security

Mitt Romney Wrote That Individual Accounts, Paid By The Borrowing Of Treasuries Sales, Was An Option To Solve Social Security. In his book “No Apology” Mitt Romney wrote “Individual retirement accounts offer a fourth option, one that would allow today’s wage earners to direct a portion of their Social Security tax to a private account rather than go entirely to pay the benefits of current retirees, as is the case today. The federal government would make up for its lost Social Security revenue by borrowing that amount through the sale of treasuries, just as it currently does for the rest of its deficits. Owners of these individual accounts would invest in a combination of stocks and bonds and—presuming these investments paid a higher rate of return than the new treasuries—the return on these investments would boost the payments to seniors. I also like the fact the individual retirement accounts would encourage more Americans to invest in the private sector that powers our economy. [“No Apology” 2011 Pg. 175-176]

News Saturday, Jan 1 2011

Jon Bruning On Medicare And Social Security

Bruning Proposed Raising Social Security Retirement Age To 70, Capping Medicaid. "'Fixing this will involve serious conversations about entitlements,' Bruning continued. 'Nelson continues to vote toward layering on the entitlements. The problem is that we can’t get to the point where the government is involved in every point of people’s lives. We just keep spending whatever it takes and borrow it from the Chinese. We need to make Medicaid and Social Security stronger for the future — they are great programs but it can’t continue the way it’s being done.' Bruning suggests raising the retirement age to 70 and putting a cap on Medicaid allowances." [York News-Times, 9/9/11]

News Saturday, Jan 1 2011

Dennis Rehberg On Social Security

Rehberg Said Private Accounts Should Be Considered. While he refused to outright endorse Bush’s idea of personal Social Security investment accounts, he suggested that he was open to considering the president’s plan. “I want to see all the proposals, he said. “But why not consider such personal accounts that would earn a higher return for young adults that they would own and could pass on to their kids?” [Great Falls Tribune, 2/4/05]

News Saturday, Jan 1 2011

Scott Brown On The Budget

Brown Said He Would Support Ryan Budget That Would End Medicare As We Know It And Double Out-Of-Pocket Costs For Seniors. In a speech, Brown said “The leaders will bring forward (Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan’s) budget, and I will vote for it, and it will fail.” The GOP budget included proposals to convert the federal share of Medicaid to a block grant to states. It also called for converting Medicare for persons currently younger than 55 into a “premium support system” through which the government would pay private insurance companies directly for each enrollee. The Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel reported, “The Ryan budget plan would cut federal spending on Medicaid, which provides health care for the poor, and begin distributing money by block grant to states. The plan would do away with Medicare’s direct payment for health care for seniors, replacing it with a voucher system in which recipients choose private insurers. The Congressional Budget Office found that part of the plan, which would take effect in 2022, could nearly double out-of-pocket costs for seniors.” In an April 7th, 2011 editorial, the Newark Star-Ledger warned that Paul Ryan’s plan would “end Medicare as we know it.” [Newburyport News, 5/14/11; Ft Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel, 4/16/2011; Newark Star-Ledger Editorial, 4/7/2011]

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